Ida B. Wells & Lynching in the South (1895) Primary Source Activity

lynching

“Not all nor nearly all of the murders done by white men during the past thirty years in the South have come to light, but the statistics as gathered and preserved by white men, and which have not been questioned, show that during these years more than ten thousand Negroes have been killed in cold blood without the formality of judicial trial and legal execution….

The first excuse given to the civilized world for the murder of unoffending Negroes was the necessity of the white man to repress and stamp out alleged “race riots.” For years immediately succeeding the war there was an appalling slaughter of colored people, and the wires usually conveyed to northern people and the world the intelligence, first, that an insurrection was being planned by Negroes, which, a few hours later, would prove to have been vigorously resisted by white men, and controlled with a resulting loss of several killed and wounded. It was always a remarkable feature in these insurrections and riots that only Negroes were killed during the rioting, and that all the white men escaped unharmed….”

Click on the link below to download the full primary source document with analysis questions.

Ida B. Wells & Lynching in the South Primary Source Activity

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About historymartinez

Social Studies Department Chair, Room A305 Tutoring Mondays @ 4:15 pm & Wednesdays @ 8:00 a.m.
This entry was posted in Civil War and Reconstruction Era, Gilded Age & Industrial Revolution Era, Gilded Age & Progressive Era, Populist Era & Industrial Revolution, U.S. History. Bookmark the permalink.

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