Jane Addams & “Why women should vote” Primary Source Activity

jane addams votes for women

“This paper is an attempt to show that many women to-day are failing to discharge their duties to their own households properly simply because they do not perceive that as society grows more complicated it, is necessary that woman shall extend her sense of responsibility to many things outside of her own home if she would continue to preserve the home in its entirety. One could illustrate in many ways. A woman’s simplest duty, one would say, is to keep her house clean and wholesome and to feed her children properly. Yet if she lives in a tenement house, as so many of my neighbors do, she cannot fulfill these simple obligations by her own efforts because she is utterly dependent upon the city administration for the conditions which render decent living possible….”

Click on the link to download the full primary source document with analysis questions:

Jane Addams Why Women Should Vote Primary Source Activity

Posted in Gilded Age & Progressive Era, U.S. History, WWI The Great War | Leave a comment

2016 Buffaloes Golf Team

c

Emmanuel Vasquez – State Regional Qualifier !

golf team with martinez 2016

Coach Martinez poses with his 2016 District Golf Team – Go Buffaloes !

IMG_2305

2016 District Girls Golf Team

IMG_2309

2016 District Boys Golf Team

IMG_2312 IMG_2313 golf 2 IMG_2314 IMG_2316 IMG_2322 IMG_2326 IMG_2339 f golf 6 golf 5 l h golf diego  10

Posted in Personal Photographs | 1 Comment

American Forests by John Muir (1901) Primary Source Activity

john muir

“…. American forests! the glory of the world! Surveyed thus from the east to the west, from the north to the south, they are rich beyond thought, immortal, immeasurable, enough and to spare for every feeding, sheltering beast and bird, insect and son of Adam; and nobody need have cared had there been no pines in Norway, no cedars and deodars on Lebanon and the Himalayas, no vine-clad selvas in the basin of the Amazon. With such variety, harmony, and triumphant exuberance, even nature, it would seem, might have rested content with the forests of North America, and planted no more.

So they appeared a few centuries ago when they were rejoicing in wildness. The Indians with stone axes could do them no more harm than could gnawing beavers and browsing moose. Even the fires of the Indians and the fierce shattering lightning seemed to work together only for good in clearing spots here and there for smooth garden prairies, and openings for sunflowers seeking the light. But when the steel axe of the white man rang out in the startled air their doom was sealed. Every tree heard the bodeful sound, and pillars of smoke gave the sign in the sky.

I suppose we need not go mourning the buffaloes. In the nature of things they had to give place to better cattle, though the change might have been made without barbarous wickedness. Likewise many of nature’s five hundred kinds of wild trees had to make way for orchards and cornfields. In the settlement and civilization of the country, bread more than timber or beauty was wanted; and in the blindness of hunger, the early settlers, claiming Heaven as their guide, regarded God’s trees as only a larger kind of pernicious weeds, extremely hard to get rid of. Accordingly, with no eye to the future, these pious destroyers waged interminable forest wars; chips flew thick and fast; trees in their beauty fell crashing by millions, smashed to confusion, and the smoke of their burning has been rising to heaven more than two hundred years….”

Click on the link below to download the full primary source document with analysis questions:

American Forest by John Muir Primary Source Activity

Posted in Gilded Age & Progressive Era, U.S. History | Leave a comment

Opposition to Chinese Immigration (1878) Primary Source Activity

chinese immigration

Created by XEROX image service

“The Chinese have now lived among us, in considerable numbers, for a quarter of a century, and yet they remain in separate, distinct from, and antagonistic to our people in thinking, mode of life, in tastes and principles, and are as far from assimilation as when they first arrived….

They fail to comprehend our system of government; they perform no duties of citizenship; they are not available as jurymen; cannot be called upon as a posse comitatus (sheriff’s deputies) to preserve order, nor be relied upon as soldiers.

They do not comprehend or appreciate our social ideas, and they contribute but little to support of any of our institutions, public or private.

They bring no children with them, and there is, therefore, no possibility of influencing them but our ordinary educational appliances.

There is, indeed, no point of contact between the Chinese and our people through which we can Americanize them. The rigidity, which characterizes these people, forbids the hope of essential change in their relations to our people or our government.

We respectfully submit the admitted proposition that no nation, much less a republic, can safely permit the presence of a large and increasing element among its people which cannot be assimilated or made to comprehend the responsibilities of citizenship…..

The great mass of the Chinese residents of California are not amenable to our laws.  It is almost impossible to procure the conviction of Chinese criminals, and we are never sure that a conviction, even when obtained, is in accordance with justice.”

Click on the link below to download the full primary source document and analysis questions:

Opposition to Chinese Immigration 1878 primary source activity

Posted in Civil War and Reconstruction Era, Gilded Age & Industrial Revolution Era, Gilded Age & Progressive Era, Populist Era & Industrial Revolution, U.S. History | Leave a comment

Italian Immigrant in Gilded Age America (1902) Primary Source Activity

little italy

“Now and then I had heard things about America that it was a far off country where everybody was rich and that Italians went there and made plenty of money, so that they could return to Italy and live in pleasure ever after. One day I met a young man who pulled out a handful of gold and told me he had made that in America in a few days.

I said I should like to go there, and he told me that if I went he would take care of me and see that I was safe. I told Francisco and he wanted to go, too….

…. We were all landed on an island and the bosses there said that Francisco and I must go back because we had not enough money, but a man named Bartolo came up and told them that we were brothers and he was our uncle and would take care of us. He brought two other men who swore that they knew us in Italy and that Bartolo was our uncle. I had never seen any of them before, but even then Bartolo might be my uncle, so I did not say anything. The bosses of the island let us go out with Bartolo after he had made the oath….”

Click on the link below to download the full primary source document with analysis questions:

Italian Immigrant in Gilded Age America 1902 primary source activity

Posted in Gilded Age & Industrial Revolution Era, Gilded Age & Progressive Era, Populist Era & Industrial Revolution, U.S. History | Leave a comment

The Story of a Sweatshop Girl (1902) Primary Source Activity

sweatshop

“Aunt Fanny had always been anxious for me to get an education, as I did not know how to read or write, and she thought that was wrong. Schools are different in Poland from what they are in this country, and I was always too busy to learn to read and write. So when mother died I thought I would try to learn a trade and then I could go to school at night and learn to speak the English language well.

So I went to work in Allen street (Manhattan) in what they call a sweatshop, making skirts by machine. I was new at the work and the foreman scolded me a great deal.

“Now, then,” he would say, “this place is not for you to be looking around in. Attend to your work. That is what you have to do.”

I did not know at first that you must not look around and talk, and I made many mistakes with the sewing, so that I was often called a “stupid animal.” But I made $4 a week by working six days in the week For there are two Sabbaths here our own Sabbath, that comes on a Saturday, and the Christian Sabbath that comes on Sunday. It is against our law to work on our own Sabbath, so we work on their Sabbath….”

Click on the link below to download the full primary source document with analysis questions:

Story of a sweatshop girl 1902 primary source activity

Posted in Gilded Age & Industrial Revolution Era, Gilded Age & Progressive Era, Populist Era & Industrial Revolution, U.S. History | Leave a comment

W.E.B. Du Bois on Booker T. Washington (1903) Primary Source Activity

du bois

“Mr. Washington represents in Negro thought the old attitude of adjustment and submission; but adjustment at such a peculiar time as to make his programme unique. This is an age of unusual economic development, and Mr. Washington’s programme naturally takes an economic cast, becoming a gospel of Work and Money to such an extent as apparently almost completely to overshadow the higher aims of life.

Moreover, this is an age when the more advanced races are coming in closer contact with the less developed races, and the race-feeling is therefore intensified; and Mr. Washington’s programme practically accepts the alleged inferiority of the Negro races. Again, in our own land, the reaction from the sentiment of war time has given impetus to race-prejudice against Negroes, and Mr. Washington withdraws many of the high demands of Negroes as men and American citizens. In other periods of intensified prejudice all the Negro’s tendency to self-assertion has been called forth; at this period a policy of submission is advocated. In the history of nearly all other races and peoples the doctrine preached at such crises has been that manly self-respect is worth more than lands and houses, and that a people who voluntarily surrender such respect, or cease striving for it, are not worth civilizing.

In answer to this, it has been claimed that the Negro can survive only through submission. Mr. Washington distinctly asks that black people give up, at least for the present, three things,–

First, political power,
Second, insistence on civil rights,
Third, higher education of Negro youth,–”

Click on the link below to download the full primary source document with analysis questions.

Du Bois on Booker T Washington Primary Source Activity

 

 

Posted in Gilded Age & Industrial Revolution Era, Gilded Age & Progressive Era, Populist Era & Industrial Revolution, U.S. History | Leave a comment